The Genesis – Persona 4

Listen to the end. Trust me; you won’t regret it.

This is such a fascinating song that I had to write an entire article about it. Maybe not a long article, but I just wanted to share my thoughts on this song and why it’s personally one of my favorite tracks in the whole Persona 4 soundtrack. People talk about it being boring, and while they’re allowed to have their own opinions, I couldn’t agree less than I already do.

Maybe it’s because of this following fact. I’m not the biggest fan of Persona 4‘s soundtrack in general, at least, in comparison to the other games’ soundtracks. (My personal favorites are the soundtrack of P1, both the PSP and PS1 versions, P2: Eternal Punishment, P3, and P5.) People talk about it being too slow for the “true final battle” theme, and yes, it is a little slow, but it’s incredible. This track just stands out to me more than most songs in the P4 soundtrack do because of its intimidating and ominous nature. The true final boss is most certainly a formidable foe, and this song is probably the most fitting song Shoji Meguro could have composed for it.

In a game with music that gives off a pop/rock vibe, a song like this, with a classical orchestra feeling, really just provides that atmosphere change that really shows you you’re in the endgame now. Even The Mist, another one of my favorite tracks from P4, doesn’t scream “final boss” like this song does. At least to me, anyway. All of this is my own opinion, and I can absolutely see why people would disagree with me. But I’m coming from the perspective of a former choir/music theory major. In the years I performed in choir and have studied music theory, I learned to be able to feel what music was saying through the timbre of the instruments, the way the time signature is utilized, the cadence of the melody as it combines with the background harmonies, the list goes on.

My point is that just about every song out there tells a story, and it doesn’t need lyrics to tell that story. You can understand what it’s saying through close listening and truly immersing yourself in the song. This song gives off the perfect foreboding aura such an intimidating final boss deserves. It sort of reminds me of the song “Transient Butterfly” from the PS1 version of the first Persona game, at least in its structure and what sort of feeling it’s giving off. Except unlike that song, “The Genesis” has that bit of hope at the end of the game where it brings things back full circle with the melody of “Reach Out to the Truth”, another one of my favorite tracks from this game. That ending always gives me chills.

Long rant short, I personally think this song is absolutely incredible, and it’s the perfect track for the true final battle. Also, the instruments give off very heavy Strange Journey vibes. I know that both games’ soundtracks were composed by Shoji Meguro, but still. Strange Journey is one of my favorite games of all time, and I absolutely love that Meguro threw some of that game’s music style into a Persona game. Goes to show it’s true that every Persona game’s final battle theme has some Shin Megami Tensei inspiration.

My Mistake – Tokyo Mirage Sessions’s Difficulty

Allow me to show you the song of my people.

Well, I’ve been playing a lot of this game recently; I don’t have much time to play it with my current schedule, but basically, I’ll play it for a couple hours each evening before turning in so I can wake up early enough to go to work. I will say that I absolutely love it still, don’t worry. Despite what the title says, this game is still one of my favorite RPGs. I just want to discuss something I said in my last article about this game and redact that statement.

First off, I’m still on chapter one, which I suppose I should have expected. It’s an Atlus game; they can usually be pretty long. I think I keep forgetting that, since I get all caught up in the fact that it’s a Nintendo home console RPG, and the only one of those I’m familiar with these days are the Xenoblade games, so I keep forgetting it’s a Shin Megami Tensei game, ultimately.

I finally just started getting into the actual dungeon-crawling of the game last night and had a lot of fun with it! I’m starting to see its similarities to games like Shin Megami Tensei IV and the fact that it uses the classic Weapon Triangle from Fire Emblem. (For those who don’t know, almost all Fire Emblem games have one common rule: swords beat axes, axes beat lances, and lances beat swords, and these rules also apply to this game.)

In this game, you can encounter Savage Enemies, which might as well be like encountering the Reaper in a Persona game. Unlike the Reaper, you still sort of stand a chance against them, but if it’s a team of four when you only have three party members at this point in the game, not an ice cube’s chance in hell. I’ve been attempting to level grind, but once you’re up to level 10, it takes quite a while when you’re still fighting enemies between levels 2 and 7. With that in mind, I start actively seeking out Savage Enemies since they give a ton of EXP if you beat them.

That was my mistake.

I’m pretty sure the Savage Enemy encounters change based on where your own level is at, because once I hit level 10, I started encountering one particularly savage group that consisted of two sword-wielders and two axe-wielders, all of which are level 16. To get an idea of how terrible this really is, keep the Weapon Triangle in mind and the fact that I only have three party members six level below these enemies. The main protagonist, Itsuki, is a sword-wielder, and his friends Tsubasa and Touma are both spear/lance-wielders, so no matter what, unless you destroy one of each type of enemy so they can’t use combos on you, you’re as good as dead.

I say this from experience because until just now as I’m writing this article, I didn’t realize that killing one of each type prevented that. You just need to figure out a strategy to do it fast enough before they can start using their awful combos on you, since enemies can also use Session attacks if there’s more than one enemy in a single type. I died so many times that I unlocked “Friendly” mode, which is the easiest difficulty, so I temporarily changed it to that just to at least make some sort of progress.

Fortunately, I did make it to the mid-boss of the first dungeon, but I’m still frustrated at myself more than anything for underestimating this game’s difficulty. However, now I know what I’m getting into. I just need to remember that it really is a Shin Megami Tensei game, and it will most certainly be difficult. I’ll be changing the difficulty back to Normal when I go back to play it tonight, so here’s to hoping it doesn’t end in failure.

Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE – First Impressions

I love this game and its music so much, and I’m only an hour and a half in.

Let me give you a bit of background regarding this game. I first heard of it back before I was even into the Shin Megami Tensei series. Hell, it was before I even played Persona 3, so I wasn’t quite familiar with Atlus back then like I am now. All I knew was that it was some crossover between Fire Emblem, a series I had become well-acquainted with over the years thanks to my co-author, and Shin Megami Tensei, a series I’d only heard of, and I was interested in seeing what it was like.

I bought the game digitally when I had just gotten my Wii U and gave it a try. From what I can recall, I enjoyed it. Like most modern Fire Emblem games, it’s full of fan service, but when you set that fact aside, it’s a pretty solid RPG. The music is great, the dialogue is well-written, the visual style is very vibrant and unique, the gameplay is rather reminiscent of Persona 3 Portable‘s system.

Instead of using the “1 More” system or “press-turn” combat from its parent games, it uses a fun “Session” battle system. Attacking an enemy’s weakness will allow your allies to use special Session skills as long as your attack meets the criteria required for their skill to activate. It’s simpler than it sounds, but it’s a great and very unique system!

Well, I ended up needing to delete the game due to storage issues, but whenever I tried to reinstall it, it would give me an error and wouldn’t work. I finally just invested in a physical copy, and totally forgot I ordered it until it arrived today, as a matter of fact. I wanted to wait until a little later in the evening to play it, since I usually like to spend time with my family when I’m off work.

I excitedly put the game in and when I started it, I was thoroughly impressed with its overall presentation. Some people may find it cheesy, but I love that about it. It does not at all feel out of place. Even though it’s technically a Shin Megami Tensei game, it feels like it would totally fit as a mainline Persona entry. Atlus really did an incredible job on this sorely underrated game. Even though I hear the US release was heavily censored in comparison to the original Japanese version, I honestly don’t care that much about that. The game is just sheer fun.

Like any other Shin Megami Tensei game, the difficulty is, well, I wouldn’t say too difficult, but when playing on Normal mode like I am, it feels well-balanced. It provides just enough of a challenge to not feel unfair, but to where it feels like you actually need to provide thought and strategy into what you use your turns for. Like I mentioned before, buffs and debuffs are your friend, especially in the first boss fight. Even though I had all my party members up to level 5 by the boss fight in the Prologue, it proved to be quite a challenging fight. Fortunately, two of the protagonists both learn buffs to boost offense and defense for the whole party by the time they reach level 5, so that helped quite a lot.

All this rambling aside, I just want to say that even though I just started this game, it was well worth the money, and listening to “Reincarnation” just makes me so happy. I can’t wait to play more of this game. I’d highly recommend picking it up if you can if you like RPGs in general, especially if you enjoy Fire Emblem, Shin Megami Tensei, Persona, or preferably, all three.

“One More God Rejected”

Believe it or not, there are lyrics in the garbled vocal mess in this song.

The more I listen to this song, the more fascinating it becomes. I’ll start off by saying that unlike many others, Nocturne was not my introduction to the series. I actually started off with Shin Megami Tensei I and IV at the same time and quickly became obsessed with the series. I fell in love with the intro of this theme, and wondered what in the world the vocal craziness in the background was all about.

A few of the battle themes in this game have the same garbled vocals in them, and one day when I was looking through the YouTube comments on one of the songs, I found out that they aren’t just demonic-sounding chants. They’re legitimate lyrics, and most interpretations of them say they’re from high angelic figures speaking out against the Demi-Fiend, which is the main character of our story. In this particular song, I’ve seen interpretations saying that it’s the highest angel Metatron trying to frighten and intimidate the protagonist, and honestly, I just find that so fascinating.

People have all sorts of interpretations as to what the lyrics actually are, and perhaps that’s intentional on Shoji Meguro’s part. It’s meant to be heard differently, other than the most famous lyrics: “One more God rejected.” Here is what I hear:

I’m heaven above outside you
I have your back to the wall
Survived the fall from grace
Drink of the wine of the wrath of God
One more God rejected
I’m heaven above outside you
One more God rejected
I have your back to the wall
One more God rejected
Survived the fall from grace
Thou shall not oppose the wrath of God
Fear
Fear God and give glory to Him
For the hour of His judgement has come to you.
Now
When a thousand years have expired,

Satan will be released
Judgement has come to you.

When you look at it like that, it definitely sounds like it’s Metatron or another angel of some sort trying to intimidate the protagonist. I’ll admit that I am of faith (even though I don’t consider myself part of any religious group), but I still find this so fascinating to listen to. Feel free to leave a comment about your own interpretations! I’d love to discuss further meanings of the song and see what you guys think.