What Made You Fall in Love With Video Games?

This is a question I am genuinely curious about for pretty much anyone. If you’re passionate about video games, then at some point in time, there was one game that sparked that passion. In the comments, let me know what is that video game that made you fall in love with the whole medium, and what about that game is what made you feel that way?

Nostalgia in Video Games

I’ve been on a Final Fantasy kick the past few days, going back and playing a bunch at once, which is never a good idea, but I like to keep my options open, so I generally play multiple games at a time instead of focusing on one. (Gotta love starting with a run-on sentence.) But after playing them for a while, I got to thinking about my feelings regarding the series. Primarily, the fact that my tastes have changed.

Growing up, Final Fantasy IX was my go-to game, at least until my PS1 broke. Then I just got the port on the PSP and PS3 before it was released on the current gen consoles. There was something I loved about its world, the characters, and the story it had to tell. Back then, I didn’t have as much experience with the series as I do now. I was still new to RPGs in general. But after spending almost 50 hours on the game in my current playthrough, I’ve realized that I don’t quite feel its magic as much as I used to. Granted, that could be because of dealing with adult life in the middle of a pandemic and a screwed up government, so magic is pretty hard to come by these days, but still.

Whether it’s that or the fact that I just burned myself out on the game, I don’t feel it the way I used to. With that, I decided to take a break from Final Fantasy IX and start a new file in Final Fantasy VII instead. (With the help of my girlfriend, because I am indecisive and couldn’t choose between VII and VIII, so she chose for me.) The moment I booted the game up and heard the opening theme, I felt right back at home. Even as I write this post, I’m blaring the Final Fantasy VII soundtrack. I’m already three hours in with Aerith in Wall Market, and still having a blast.

After playing it for just a few minutes, however, I realized something. I even talked to my brother about it to see if he felt the same. I have the Final Fantasy VII Remake, and I have absolutely and thoroughly enjoyed it. However, I seem to enjoy the original game more despite the fact that the remake added so many amazing new parts and fixed many of the narrative issues the original game had. But why is that, when the remake is most definitely an improvement? My brother got back to me and said he felt the same way, and explained it’s because of the nostalgia we have attached to the game.

As kids, even though we never had a copy of the game because it was too expensive online due to scalpers, we were super into Final Fantasy VII‘s lore, the characters, the story, the music, everything. We’d seen Advent Children multiple times, we had a copy of Crisis Core that we played the hell out of, we watched playthroughs, we pretended to be characters from the game when playing outside, and we even attempted to dress as Cloud and Sephiroth one Halloween.

Thinking about it that way, it occurred to me that the nostalgia was a big reason why I had such an attachment to the original game. Playing it brings me back to that point in time when life wasn’t so crazy. But of course, that’s just looking at life through rose-tinted glasses. We often make the past seem much grander than it really was, especially when the present day feels so hopeless. While it’s fine to reminisce on the past, it’s important to avoid over glorifying it, since that makes us resent the present even more. At least, in my experience. The point is that Final Fantasy VII gives me this feeling of being right at home. On top of that, I just enjoy the turn-based combat system more.

While I personally enjoy the original Final Fantasy VII more than the remake, that doesn’t mean I think any less of the remake. Heck, even now, I also feel like playing that. What it means is that this solidifies that our tastes are purely subjective, because we don’t all share the same memories. The collective unconscious might be a thing, but at the end of the day, we’ve all lived our own lives and made our own memories. We each have memories attached to things like video games, music, books, shows, movies, etc. That’s often why we get attached to them. It’s not the only reason we get attached to them, of course. That’s a whole other article in itself right there. But it is a common reason.

While nostalgia does often increase our love for a game, I’ve noticed that a lot of people either use it against others, or get defensive if others don’t like a game they enjoyed, or if someone likes a game they did not enjoy. Looking at it from a psychological point of view, I always saw this as a case of someone making the things they like part of their identity. So when someone dislikes something they like, it’s as though they feel like those people are disliking them, and they take it personally, intentional or not. I say that because that’s how I used to be and still sometimes feel.

When that happens, I reevaluate myself. The world is crazy right now. With social media being a thing, it’s easy for us to lose our sense of self. Perhaps it’s a feeling of inadequacy, helplessness, loneliness, or we’re lacking something important in our lives, like serotonin. Something makes us latch onto the things we enjoy and treat them like they’re an extension of ourselves, and that becomes a very thin shield to protect our rather fragile hearts. There’s nothing wrong with enjoying a game, especially if it brings back wonderful memories. We all need any bit of happiness we can get. It’s equally important to not forget our sense of self.

Persona 3’s Unique Effect

Persona 3 is a game I’ve written about before, but I wanted to go back to it for a little bit to discuss it from a more personal perspective. Over the years, I’ve noticed a particular effect this game has on myself and others alike. That effect has become even more apparent to me now. Part of it is the fact that I keep coming back to it. When I deal with depression, I’m usually not in the mood for any game, nor am I in the mood to write. (Which leads to other complications, but that’s another story.) However, I restarted this game today, and played for almost three hours without even realizing it.

There’s a certain charm to Persona 3, specifically the PS2 versions. Don’t get me wrong; the PSP version is amazing and I absolutely adore the female protagonist. But something about the PS2 version feels different, and keeps me coming back even after I’ve fallen victim to Night Queen for the billionth time. The obvious answer would probably be nostalgia, since FES was the game that started my passion for the Megaten series. However, I feel like that’s just looking at it from the surface. I think there’s more to it.

Persona 3’s themes cover an internal struggle, overcoming grief and depression, and perhaps one of the hardest things we as humans must face: accepting the inevitability of our deaths. The first line in the game is “Time waits for no one. It delivers us all to the same end.” I didn’t realize the significance of that intro until long after I played the game for the first time and started understanding the true meaning behind the game. While it is about death and depression, that’s not all it’s about.

I feel like everyone could come up with their own interpretation for the game’s deeper implications, but here’s what I’ve come up with. It’s less about the sorrowful elements of the themes and more about how accepting the inevitability of death is only half of the equation. Once you’ve accepted that and acknowledged that you have a limited amount of time here, enjoy the time you have. Tell the people closest to you that you love them. We never know what tomorrow may bring, so treasure the time we have today.

So, that’s my not-so-revolutionizing revolution about Persona 3’s themes. What does this have to do about its special effect? It’s the simple fact that even though these themes aren’t super obvious, the game was so well-crafted that it’s hidden everywhere in the subtlest of places. You can feel the passion behind the game, the care that was put into making sure it told the story it was meant to tell and to convey the messages the writers wanted to get across. It may not be my favorite Persona game, but it has changed my life for the better, and I will continue playing it for many years to come.

The Everlasting Appeal of Persona 4

If there’s one thing that’s been consistent about the RPG genre for the past decade, it’s that Persona 4 has always had a presence. Even before I knew what the series was, I’d heard of Persona 4 from at least some people. Though you might say what you wish about the game, it seems it has always had a place in people’s hearts, both classic fans and new. With the release of Persona 4 Golden on Steam, this point has once again been revived. What was once exclusive to a handheld console has become far more accessible. With this comes the increase in a player base. From what I heard, it sounds like the PC release of Persona 4 Golden was quite successful, even to the point where Atlus and Sega are considering PC releases of their other games.

That’s a point for another day though. The main point is that Persona 4, even nowadays, is still beloved by many. Even a friend of mine who normally does not like turn-based RPGs enjoys the game quite a lot. I’ve been thinking about why it’s still so popular even after all these years, since even I consider it my favorite game in the series. (I have played all six main games in the series, so I have given every game a fair chance as well.) The main reason I consider it my favorite game in the series can be put simply. In terms of the things I look for in a game, it hits all the marks perfectly. The writing is great, the music is incredible, the gameplay is simple but fun, the story is fascinating, and most importantly, the dynamic between the main characters is written wonderfully.

None of these are objective facts, since people’s opinions on writing and music are vastly different, but there’s a certain charm to Persona 4, its characters and setting in particular, that always stood out to me. After talking to my aforementioned friend about the game, I tried figuring out why this game is so beloved. It could be for a number of reasons. The story, the gameplay, the dating sim elements (gotta love the waifus and the husbandos you wish the game would let you date [just let me date Kanji, dammit]), the music, the list goes on.

Thinking about it, I broke it down to a rather simple idea. I think the reason why people love it so much is because the game treats the idea that less is more. The story and the setting are both rather simplistic when you really break it down. As a result, the game is able to focus much more on the actual characters themselves. It has a much heavier focus on hanging out with your friends and getting to know them, and it makes the game feel more personal in that way. You also get to see how the characters interact with each other as friends and it really makes the player feel like they’re part of this entertaining group of close friends living out in the countryside.

Persona 4 is like a comfort game in that way. During a time where we all feel uncertain and tired from the state of everything right now, Atlus re-released this game at the perfect time. If you enjoy RPGs and need a new comfort game, I would definitely recommend this game. It’s not for everyone, which can be said for pretty much every game in existence, but I can personally say that it has served as a perfect comfort game during these times of heavy stress and facing potential unemployment.

Why I Like RPGs

The turn-based RPG genre certainly has dedicated fans, but I know a few people who don’t fully understand the appeal. Honestly, I don’t blame them either. We as human beings have incredibly varying tastes. It’s only natural for one person to absolutely love something and another to completely dislike it. Granted, the people I know don’t completely dislike the genre, but they aren’t big fans of it. I’m sure there are many people who dislike or even completely hate it as well, which I understand. It’s not for everyone. But today, I decided I would like to break down what it is exactly about this genre of game that I really enjoy, and why I love diving deep into these typically long adventures fraught with danger, story, and stats.

When growing up, I didn’t even really know what RPGs were until I was 12 years old. The only games I knew were Mario, Zelda, Mortal Kombat, and Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2, since they were the games my parents played. My dad told me a little bit about the Final Fantasy series as a kid, though all I knew about the series was that it had great music. When I was 12 years old, however, I got my first RPG: Final Fantasy IV on the GBA.

The moment I played it, I fell in love. I’ve never been what one might consider “good” at video games, so the idea of a game where you choose the actions for your character to do rather than having to fight with your own skill was practically a godsend as a kid. Finally, a game I actually had a chance at beating. On top of the combat, I enjoyed the character-driven narrative. Before then, the only story I’d ever known in a video game was that the world was in danger and you had to save it. But with Final Fantasy IV, it dove deeper into the personal affairs and struggles of the game’s cast, showing the more human side of the characters you’re playing as. At that point, the game was more than a game: it became a story.

Nowadays, you can find these deep story-driven games in any genre. The Last of Us games are probably the biggest example of this, given their major cinematic approach to storytelling. However, I think the reason I enjoy them so much more in RPGs is because with the games being simpler mechanically, it allows more room for character growth and actual plot. That’s generally why RPGs are known as long games. They don’t always have to be, of course; you can still have a great story-driven RPG but have it only be a couple hours long. But as a kid with nothing much to do, my childhood self loved long games and knowing that it would take me a while to reach the end of the journey.

This has mostly been a rant on how I feel about the story-driven elements of these games, so I’ll get back on track before I digress more.

Despite my rants, the reason why I love RPGs is rather simple: because I think they’re fun. I understand that not everyone finds them fun because they would rather use their own skill and not depend on luck and numbers in combat, which is completely fine. I agree that things based on RNG can be annoying (like status ailments in Persona 1 ruining everything), but at the same time, there’s more to it in my mind.

When you’re playing an RPG, you become part of the world in the game. You get to see the lives of the characters and you join them on their journey. Much like real life, things happen that you simply can’t avoid. Even so, the game is meant for you to keep pushing forward. It’s especially compelling once you get attached to the characters. That’s why I’m continuing Persona 1 despite my previous protests to doing so. I’ve gotten too attached to the characters to just stop playing after getting one ending.

The other factor here is the mechanics. Most RPGs generally have simple mechanics in terms of combat that are easy to understand, and some have more complex mechanics. However, they generally follow the same formula. You fight enemies, you input commands, you gain experience in some way (either the traditional way or you gain points to allocate to different stats), and you get some form of treasure. Rinse and repeat. For many people, I’m sure this formula is quite boring. It can certainly be repetitive, yes, but there’s something I find comforting about it. Or perhaps cathartic.

I find enjoyment in the process of progressing the strength of the characters via this system. Xenoblade Chronicles is an example of what I personally think is the ideal character-building system. On top of gaining tradition level ups through EXP, you learn Arts and can level them up accordingly, you have skill trees which level up with SP, and you have the Gem system, where you can alter each character’s stats and abilities in combat and on the field. It is an incredible system of customization. It does require plenty of patience to go through so many menu screens to get the character build you want, but for someone like me, I think it’s perfect. It feels productive, and it feels fun.

Again, despite the ramblings of this nerd, the reason I enjoy RPGs is simple. I enjoy their narratives, I love the mechanics, I absolutely adore getting absorbed through the storytelling and the music especially, and I just like seeing the characters get stronger through numbers as well. I totally get why people would dislike it, and I would never dissuade people because of their opinions. This is merely the opinion of a tired nerd, even if it doesn’t fully make sense. Also, RPGs are a big reason why I’m an author now, so I have that bias going for me as well.

The Struggle Begins Anew

Well, as stated in my previous article, I am giving Persona 1 another try! As annoying as the game can be, I am excited to be back at it. Not only so I can experience this game again to its fullest, but because this series is getting me back into the video production process. On top of the skit I posted previously, I get to edit the videos in this series and have fun with it, providing more info than I can in the actual commentary with edits and the like. I think that once I start getting into the combat elements of this playthrough, I will even go so far as to provide the stats for every single demon, their strengths and weaknesses, and perhaps some information on the lore behind them! If it gets to be much, I can even make separate videos talking about them, since I want to go all-out with them.

The first episode of this playthrough is live on YouTube as of today! Feel free to check it below and let me know if you have any feedback!

Why I Can’t Leave Persona 1 Alone

For those who don’t know, I started a YouTube/Twitch playthrough for Shin Megami Tensei: Persona last year, specifically, the PSP version with a patch that includes the original PS1 soundtrack. After over a year of hardship with the game, I finally got to the end and technically beat it, though the recording containing the ending was lost. It didn’t matter anyway, since it was the bad ending of the SEBEC chapter. I didn’t even get to see the full game. Once that was over with, I was also “done” with the game. As much as I enjoyed the characters, the atmosphere, and the story, some of the RNG was just so annoying to deal with that I couldn’t play it any longer.

Or so I thought.

It’s been about a month now since I got the bad ending and attempted to go back for the first time, and I’ve been thinking about the game. I’ve been listening to the music, thinking about the characters, and figuring out why I can’t just leave it be. It got to me bad enough to completely rid me of any motivation I originally had to play it. Why am I still thinking about it?

The answer’s simple: I actually enjoy the game despite what I keep telling myself. The RNG might be brutal, but it is by no means a bad game. It could absolutely benefit from a remaster that, at the very least, elaborates on the characters more and fixes some of the balancing issues in combat, but it’s still amazing as is.

With that being said, I ended up making and releasing an announcement video on my YouTube channel for the playthrough in which I go back to this game and play it all the way through, including both the SEBEC and Ice Queen chapters. I will be playing on the Beginner difficulty for both playthroughs in hopes that the RNG is a little nicer to me, because I’m just in this for the story, really. The game is about 55% combat anyway, so I’d rather get through battles quickly so I can see more of the story and how things develop over time.

If you’d like to see the announcement video I made (people seem to like it), feel free to check it out below! The hope is that I will be releasing Persona 1 videos every Tuesday and Thursday starting tomorrow. I hope to see you there!

A Song That Inspires Courage

I might not have been in this life for particularly long, but I’ve definitely experienced the fear of regular things in life that not only happen all the time, but are things I feel like we shouldn’t even be afraid of. I experienced this same feeling of dread and even despair just this morning, so it’s not exactly the greatest way to start the day. I panicked because after getting paid, I realized I wouldn’t have enough money to pay my phone bill (or anything else) after paying my rent, which was definitely priority number one.

I feel like the reason it hit so hard was because it was the straw that broke the camel’s back. For many of us, 2020 has been a rough year. Things always seem to get worse and worse. It’s been incredibly easy even for me to succumb to the despair of feeling like things can’t get better, and I’ve always been known to be a rather optimistic person. (A little nihilistic as well, but I feel like a small dose of that helps with the optimism.) Just this year alone, I admit that I’ve thought numerous times that it’d be much easier to just die than put up with all of this. The thought of pushing through all the troubles that I just know are ahead almost brings me tears because I know how difficult and painful it will be.

But this morning, after that feeling of panic and dread started, a simple yet beloved song of mine came to mind, and I had to listen to it.

(Here’s to hoping the video isn’t taken down.)

There’s something special about this particular theme, both this version and the original version from the GameBoy. It starts off with the familiar Legend of Zelda main theme, but then breaks off into a new section that I personally feel is even better than the original Zelda theme. Anyone who’s played a Zelda game gets the basic idea of the concept. You play as the young protagonist Link, travel a dangerous world, crawl through dark dungeons, take on huge enemies, solve puzzles, and you save the world. You endure much hardship in these games, but at the end, you never see Link give up. (So long as you play through the whole game, that is.) You see him find a way to keep moving, because he knows as well as you do that it will be worth it in the end to have fought through it all.

Listening to this theme again warmed my heart, reminded me to take a deep breath, and to remember that life is more than the trouble we endure. We have people we care about, we have things we enjoy doing. That’s what life is about, and in the famous words of Talesin Jaffe, life needs things to live. As silly a quote as this was in context, it rings true. We all need each other. And even though we’re in a time of separation right now, we’re still connected even if we don’t know each other.

This theme has reminded me to keep my own courage up. I acknowledge my feelings and concerns, but then I must cast them aside, because if I don’t, how am I supposed to move forward? It’s like my childhood experience with Zelda games. It’d take me years to beat one because I was so afraid of failure that I’d put off taking on the next boss for long amounts of time. I’d still do it, though, because I wanted to see more of the game. I wanted to experience the rest of the game’s world, meet the people who populate it, and see Link come out on top. This same wish applies to my real life. I want to surpass my trials now so I can keep moving forward, to one day see the rest of the incredible world we live in, to meet the wonderful people who live in it, and to eventually see that I might be able to make a career from my writing.

At the end of the day, we are not the same as our problems nor our thoughts. We are ourselves, and we are each strong enough to overcome these struggles. I have faith in myself, and I have faith in you, as you should. Keep going. Fight. Show the same courage our boy in green always has, and I hope you can be proud of yourself for doing so.

(Here’s the GameBoy version if you feel like listening to it.)

Important Changes to Black Crystal

Author’s Notes
Let’s get one thing out of the way: I was in the process of editing and revising the first three books in the series to match the current canon of the Black Crystal series, and I managed to succeed at doing so with The Origin, the first book in the series! But after looking at both The Essence and Elysium, the longest goddamn book I’ve ever written, I determined that I’m too lazy and tired to even try editing those books to match the current canon and revisions to the series’ world, lore, and all that good shit. At the time of writing this little “essay”, so to say, I’ve been putting The Kingdom, the fourth installment in the series, on hold for well over half a year without any progress due to a lack of motivation, and because I’ve been stuck with the past few books. Sure, a good author might stick with the program and do what they can to make sure all the books are as best as they can be, but who said I was a good author? People might like my stories, but my methods are far from effective. The older I get, the more tired I get, so I’d much rather just move forward with the story than feel stagnant and try making everything work with shit I already wrote. Don’t get me wrong. I am beyond passionate about this series. It just feels redundant to republish books that have been out for the past few years just because of a few revisions, so I’m making this recap free to read and open to the public. I hope this helps!

Revisions
Starting off, I would like to provide clarification to all the revisions that have been made to the Black Crystal canon so we’re all on the same page by the time The Kingdom is out. Ever since beginning my D&D campaign Legends of the Black Crystal, a few things have been changed for the sake of continuity, or rather, to make more sense. The most important thing is the relation between Chris and the Royal Family from the 1800s. The Essence originally indicated that 200 years passed between the Royal Family being turned to stone and Chris’s story beginning in the surprisingly modern city of Nakura, but this is officially false as of the new canon. 

I’ll explain it in more detail in the section of this essay detailing the plot of The Essence, but what happened was that Bartholomew’s curse spread around the world of Inclusia, which is where the series takes place, turning everyone to stone. The cities of Alswell and Nakura were constructed by a select group of people who had knowledge on interdimensional travel to house refugees who managed to escape the curse’s grasp. A barrier was placed around the two cities, and that barrier was set to protect everyone living in the two cities. However, since the people contracted to build them were familiar with interdimensional travel, they took inspiration from modern day Earth, which is indeed a part of the Black Crystal multiverse, since the characters Arianna Hernandez and Leon LaHayes both come from our little Blue Planet. As a result, it gives the aura of what 2017 in our world would look like, but it is still the 1800s in the rest of Inclusia. The contractors also had the ability to alter the memories of those who lived in the two cities, convincing many of the younger generations to believe they grew up on Earth and not Inclusia, which is why finding out what the world truly is becomes such a shock to the cast. The true amount of time has only been a few decades. Chris is actually the grandson of Garen and Lenora. Chris’s mother Elena and her sister Misty are Garen and Lenora’s children.

The next big thing is the geographical changes. Originally, the nation the story took place in was called the 48 Provinces, indicative of an alternate version of the United States, and Nakura was originally set to be in that world’s version of Canada. However, after deciding that my D&D campaign would take place in this world, I decided to flesh the world of Inclusia out more and give the world more original names. This is indicated in the rewritten version of The Origin, but the continent is now called Unistylaad, and there are only nine provinces. Orelivia is what used to be Oregon, and Washorick is what used to be Washington. I made sure the names were still close to the original so it wasn’t difficult to get used to them, especially for people who have read the original editions of these books. The city of Portland became the city of Livia, the city of Olympia simply turned into Olympe, the river crossing outpost Hood River became Hooded River, the militarized city of Eugene became Eugelene, and the village of Grants Pass was named Alorae. There are more towns than these, but these are the ones most prominent at the beginning of the series, so I wanted to provide clarification for them. There are six more provinces, which we will touch upon one day, but I’ll name them here: Ishtorai is a desert nation to the east of Washorick and Orelivia. South of Ishtorai is a smaller province named Selmor, where many witches practice arcane arts deemed illegal by the sovereign of Ishtorai. On a southmost peninsula below the entire continent are two isolated provinces named Caligri and Decimbra. To the far east are the three united provinces: Ohren, Flarioc, and the empire of Yorjun, which is where the provincial leaders meet to discuss political matters every few years.

The next thing isn’t a super prominent thing in the books, at least, but I thought it deserved attention: the mystery of the moon in Hooded River. At night, the moon turns green and demons emerge from the darkness. In the original version of The Origin, this was never explained. I meant for it to be more important, but I was writing the original version of the book on a deadline, and I think I just didn’t have the time to explain it. This was finally explained in our D&D campaign. This anomaly is called the Emerald Moon. Hooded River is a weak spot in reality. In other words, it’s a door to a place called the Road Between Realms. The veil that protects the prime material plane from other planes of existence is particularly weak in Hooded River, so at night, creatures from other dimensions, including those of the Infernal type who come from Hell itself, can easily pass through and enter the prime material plane from Hooded River. This was how Bartholomew managed to get such a massive legion of demons on his side in The Origin. But what does this have to do with the Emerald Moon? It’s a bit strange, you see. There are legends in Inclusia of the gods. Inclusia is a world that was not created by gods (we’ll get into that later), so the gods themselves are fascinated by this planet. Many of the gods worshipped by people living in Inclusia grew jealous of the fact that a world could exist without their will sustaining it, and thought the world deserved to be destroyed. Other gods knew this was wrong and tried to prevent them from destroying it, causing a war among the celestials. The gods who decided Inclusia was not worthy of existing were deemed “fallen gods” and were sealed away in the moon as punishment for their attempted crime. Legends say the moon turns green at certain places in the world because those are the only places where the blood of the fallen gods are visible.

Whew; that was a longer explanation than I thought. We’ll get to lore at some point, but I wanted to let you guys know some of the things that changed. Another small detail is that Chris isn’t actually “in love” with Mallory; he’s just infatuated with her, but he doesn’t really know the difference. That’s about it, in terms of revisions. If I come up with more, I’ll probably add them in the plot explanations.

The History of Inclusia
Ah, here’s something I’ve been wanting to explain for a long time—the interesting past of the world of Inclusia. I’ll keep it short though, because you can’t reveal everything; it wouldn’t be fun that way, but here’s some basic history most characters in the series are at least somewhat aware of, so I feel that you as the reader deserve to know as well.

Like I said before, Inclusia was not created by gods. It was created during a time long gone here on Earth. Long ago, we had humans and other non-humans, like monsters and elves, living among one another. Many of these people felt invisible because society shunned them or ignored them, making them feel like the world didn’t even belong to them. Some of these people even took their lives, but those who lived through it wished for a world they could call their own. Their will was so powerful that one day, these people found themselves plucked from their own reality and brought to a new planet specifically for them. This was created by a power named the Will of the Forgotten. The people who felt they didn’t belong anywhere found a home here in Inclusia, and created a society based on never making people feel alone and forgotten like they were on Earth. Hence the name Inclusia: the world was meant to be inclusive.

For many millennia, this form of society worked well. The world was big enough to carry all the people who belonged to it. The planet was quite literally made for them, by them. It fit everyone’s needs as their society developed. But one day, the peace came to an end. No one truly knows when or how it began, but humans began going around killing everything that wasn’t human or elven, believing that they would rise up and overpower humanity as they grew power-hungry. Just like the humans back on Earth. Humans wanted to make sure they stayed on top and weren’t wiped out, and ended up committing genocide in their act of trying to avoid genocide. After a hundred years of slaughter, the monsters evolved to the constant barrage of violence and got strong enough to provide a threat to the humans. The fighting only escalated until the world was literally stained with blood. Tired of the bloodshed, an elven woman named Sylvia Godswood rose to power and traveled the world, using diplomacy and kindness, and occasional head-busting, to quell the violence. It is said that her benevolence was so radiant that those who saw her beauty and heard her voice immediately stopped fighting and wept for the world, their ancestors, and the people they once considered their enemies. Sylvia slapped some sense into the people of Inclusia, reminding them what the whole point of the world was supposed to be, and they began rebuilding.

That was 12,000 years ago now. Save for some skirmishes and outside threats from other dimensions, Inclusia has not seen a battle quite as large as that battle, which was called the War of Cleansing. The only battle in recorded history that comes close is the War of 1806. Bartholomew Cadence, a mysterious man collaborating with the seemingly malevolent deity the Black Crystal, brought a legion of demons in an attempt to overthrow the kingdom of Livia. At the same time, Chancellor Anthony Guinness launched an attack on Livia with his own military force to take advantage of the fact that they were preoccupied with Bartholomew’s forces. Though the losses were heavy, Queen Maevis Morenthia managed to drive their foes away with magic unlike anything people in Orelivia or Washorick had ever seen. Bartholomew disappeared after the defeat of his demons, but came back later, revealing his power to possess the bodies of others.

Conclusion
The story’s weird, basically. Feel free to read the books as they are, and if you need reference for the revisions, they are all here. And if you do have any questions about the series, feel free to ask in the comments section of this website, or the YouTube video if you’re watching that version (which will come out soon if it isn’t already out). Either way, it’s time for me to finally get back to work on The Kingdom, so I hope you all have a great day and look forward to it!