Thoughts on Chapter Five in Bravely Default

Warning: there may potentially be spoilers ahead.

I’m a major fan of Bravely Default. I love the characters, I love the story, the art style, the unique take on turn-based combat, and the soundtrack of course. (All hail our lord and savior Revo, who is making a return in Bravely Default II.) I still have year to beat the game, but I am working on it as we speak. I spent 40 grinding, which is why it’s taken me so long to get through the plot, but when you play the game, you understand why. There’s a good incentive for grinding. Anyway, once that was done, I finally got the rest of the job classes I was missing, at least, the ones I could access, and progressed the story.

At that point, I finally made it to Chapter Five. For anyone who doesn’t know, this is a point in the story where the story sort of repeats itself in a way. You have to go around the world again and re-awaken the Four Crystals of Light, and every single boss you’ve fought in the game is back for you to thwart again. Before going into the game, I’d heard complaints about this part of the game. Perhaps it’s because I’m not far enough myself, but I don’t quite understand the complaints. People talk about it being redundant and boring, which I can understand. It is redundant, I will agree with that, but you’re not just playing the same part of the game all over again. It’s much more than that.

That is where my love for this part of the game comes in. The moment I heard the familiar voice greeting Tiz back in Caldisla after entering the Holy Pillar, I got chills. When I saw that it was just Tiz in the inn, I was a little worried. It made me wonder if the entire story as a whole would just reset, like what I’ve heard Bravely Second does if you don’t press the Start button at a certain point in time, but once the rest of the group come back up talking about how weird everything is, my worries disappeared.

Sure, the plot sort of “reset” itself in a way, but not in the way you might think. After the four protagonists discussed the matter and looked around a little, they realized that it wasn’t time travel. They were in another version of the world they knew. The people who entered the Holy Pillar with them aboard Grandship also were aware of these changes, so not everything was the same.

One of my favorite elements of this parallel world deal was how the boss fights were treated. The fights are pretty much the same as they were in the initial world, only they have higher stats, essentially. It wasn’t the fights themselves, however. It was the context behind them. Many of the bosses acted as though they knew the protagonists, some of them seemed confused by their existence. Some of them even had an inkling that they didn’t belong in that world.

The first time you fight all these bosses, they feel like such evil, almost stereotypical villainous archetypes. However, when you fight them the second time, they suddenly feel more human. Even the protagonists suddenly start feeling bad for killing some of them. The best/worst part is that it’s all optional. You could go this entire chapter without killing these bosses, but you do it because you want to see everything the story has to offer. That’s the case for me, at least. I admittedly did feel bad killing some of them. I suppose that’s the genius behind this game.

Regardless, all of this is to say that Chapter Five of Bravely Default is actually really good. Despite its redundancy, the narrative finds a way to make the game feel fresh, and show you that there’s more than one side to everything. Now after writing this, I’m in the mood to play more, so I think I’ll do just that. I hope you all have a wonderful day!

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