Why Ramble?

In a society where social media runs rampant, it seems mob mentality is inevitable on the internet. This is most apparent in the video game scene. It’s gotten so bad that people often berate others for their personal preferences in video games, consoles of choice, and even how they play a video game. Well, that’s why I’m here.

I’m a natural optimist when it comes to video games. I actively seek the good in games while accepting that not everything is perfect, so this is why my blog site exists. I want to make every gaming experience exactly that: an experience. Something we can all enjoy in. The good, the bad, everything, and reflect on said experiences. Sure, it sounds cheesy, but I think we can all benefit by seeing video games as art.

“Video games are bad for you? That’s what they said about rock and roll.” — Shigeru Miyamoto, creator of Super Mario Bros., Legend of Zelda, and many more classics

Philosophy in Persona 1

If you’ve played the beginning of Persona 1, you should be at least somewhat familiar with the seemingly out-of-context quote that shows up right at the beginning. It’s something I’ve been thinking about quite a bit recently, and I really appreciate the message behind it. At least, what I think the message is.

To provide context, the quote, which was said by a Chinese philosopher named Zhuangzi, goes something like this: “Once upon a time, I dreamt I was a butterfly. At the time, I was only conscious of my happiness of a butterfly. Soon, I awoke, and was myself again. However, I wondered, was I dreaming I was a butterfly? Or am I now a butterfly dreaming I’m a man? However, there is a clear distinction between the two, and that is the transformation of the physical.”

I may have butchered the quote itself, but that is more or less what the quote is. You get the general idea. Every time I think about this quote, it makes me rather happy, strangely enough. I think it’s because of what I took away from the quote, particularly the last part. The fact that the distinction between the two is the transformation of the physical. To me, this indicates that regardless of you being a butterfly or a human, you are still yourself on the inside, which I feel is quite fitting for a Persona game. Aside from that, the other thing I took away from that is the fact that he felt his happiness as a butterfly. My interpretation of this is that it’s very well possible to feel the same happiness as humans that we would simply fluttering around like butterflies. It’s a good mindset to have. We as humans are so bogged down by the world around us, by the minuscule problems that snowball into much larger problems that cause us to crash and burn that we simply forget happiness, or actively choose not to be happy because we’re afraid that feeling happy will backfire on us. However, something important to remember is that bad things will always happen. But if you’re spending all your time being grouchy and upset simply in preparation for these bad things to happen, you’re gonna miss all the good times that come along.

To me, this quote sort of indicates that. We as human beings can be as happy as we would be fluttering as free butterflies. It simply takes putting ourselves in that mindset, I feel. I know it’s not that simple, but it’s certainly something I’d like to put into practice myself to see if I can find more personal happiness within.

Thoughts on Humanity

This is a bit of a random thought I had in the middle of the night that I decided to document. These are all just purely my thoughts and not meant to be taken TOO seriously. I hope you find some sort of entertainment or something from reading it.

It’s often that what we see of people is a result of their background, the environment they were raised in, etc. Though there are also those who deny their upbringing in order to either be a better person, or to overcompensate and rebel.

The human mind is a complex thing, and if I intend on getting back to writing about more personal stories again, I need to think about humans more. My lack of human interaction is likely the cause of my downfall with writing, so let’s break humanity down based on personal experience and observation, starting from the basis of it all: our brains.

Our bodies, essentially, are vessels to carry our brains. Our organs and limbs are machines made to carry out our brains’ bidding. Even though our brains are made very similarly, we’re unique in the fact that our brains are entirely different from one another. The knowledge we have, the behavioral patterns we inhibit, our speech patterns, our comprehension of language, and the way in which we interact with the people and world around us are all completely different from one another based on the kind of environment we were raised in.

These environments are affected by a number of factors, internal and external. Internal factors would be the behavior and thoughts of those they were raised around, causing a massive chain reaction spanning generations. External would be things like quality of life, amount of food and water and exercise, things that are more tangible. Taking these things into consideration, you may predict how someone would turn out to be depending on these factors.

However, there’s another unique thing about our brains, and it’s our ability to adapt based on the most current knowledge we’ve retained. Someone who was raised in a racist household could very well adopt a racist point of view, but if they are influenced young enough to understand that such behavior is wrong as it brings harm to other people, they can deviate from the norm that was established by the generations of people in that household who held racist values based on things THEY learned back when they were younger.

All these behavioral patterns have a cause and effect. Some could be as simple as learning new information and changing behavior based on that, and other times, people can simply choose to change because they’ve grown tired of the people they’ve become. The possibilities for the human mind are endless. It’s rather miraculous, really, when you consider our potential. This is why our mindset affects so much about us. If the thing controlling our bodies isn’t functioning as it’s supposed to, then our bodies will inevitably feel side effects from this.

Before I digress too much, let’s get back on track. The human mind is affected by a lot throughout life. I can only imagine what the human mind was like back in the days of our Neanderthal ancestors, in which survival was the primary objective. Back then, I can’t imagine emotions were a big deal. All that mattered was that they avoided fights they couldn’t win and they would do what they could to live another day. We eventually evolved to learn the ability of foresight, and being able to make predictions according to the information available. This improved our chances of survival.

As we made more and more advanced forms of technology, our priorities shifted. It became less about survival and more about other things, like trying to live more comfortable lives. This is still a struggle for many. But now, we live in an era where survival, though important, isn’t our first priority. Life is more about living, not just surviving. It goes back to the Hierarchy of Needs. As long as you have your base needs taken care of, you can focus on the higher tiers of priorities.

Something I want to think of, a little less on the concept of writing and a little more on a personal level, is how our minds react to mental health issues, and how adaptability may help.

I suffer from depression. Sometimes, it gets so bad that I even have thoughts of putting an end to my own life. But when I consider the heroes I see in fiction that I admire, I think about everything they endure and the fact that they go through it all without succumbing to their mental problems. More often than not, their determination stems from the need to deviate from the norm, which they view as a bad thing. I feel like the modern days we live in is something to be discussed. It’s a society in which problems are glorified. It’s a contest to see who has it worst. This mindset weighs on society as a whole. There needs to be a balance. It’s okay to be upset about your station in life, but if you feel that it’s a contest between you and others to see whose life is harder, that will eventually weigh on you and will make your life even more miserable. I think part of us WANTS to be miserable, perhaps for attention, or comfort. We feel that being happy is dangerous, because whenever we’re happy, bad things happen that ruin our moods.

What if I said that it’s not as superstitious as we expect?

We set up these false expectations for life, that being happy is dangerous. It’s far easier to feel sad or angry or upset in general when so many elements in life bring us down. Our brains feel some sort of satisfaction from that comfort of feeling upset. Also, I know from experience that I’ve avoided being too happy because of the people around me; in the past, I’ve been afraid to appear happy because they are quick to try to shut your happiness down. Perhaps out of jealousy, or the desire to have other people be miserable along with them. There are more factors, I’m sure, but I feel it can be broken down to that.

The point of all of this is that regardless of how we feel, bad things will always happen. With that in mind, it makes one wonder: why aren’t we all just sad and down all the time when bad things are essentially destined to happen? Because on the flip side of that, good things will always happen too. Maybe not as soon as we’d like, but they do happen. However, based on the world around us, we find it easier to remain disappointed at all times to prepare for the bad times so that our happiness isn’t shut down when it happens. But this is what comedy is for. It’s putting the things that make us sad or upset into a different context that brings us laughter. I feel like if we had a better sense of humor as a whole, we would be better prepared for hard times. It would allow us to see more hope in the darkness, I think. But what would I know? It’s almost 3AM here while I write this and I can’t sleep, so I may just be delirious.

These could just be reassuring thoughts to myself, but I feel like it has some truth. We take life too seriously, when, in truth, we’re all still children in the bodies of adults not really knowing what we’re doing. With that, we let the uncertainty in life stress us out, and that stress becomes sadness, or anger, or any other number of negative feelings because it’s easier for us to fall to those negative emotions instead of finding the happiness out of it.

Although, there is another factor to this, I think. It’s also because we don’t allow ourselves to process our emotions enough. I have a problem crying because I was raised with the societal mindset that men shouldn’t cry, and despite my new mindsets on life, the fear of appearing weak if I shed tears remains within me. I can only cry if I’m alone, unfortunately. It all goes back to humanity affecting each other’s brains.

With that being the case, I feel like it’s a simple addition equation. For the most part. We need to learn to process our emotions in a healthy, non-self-destructive way, so our negative emotions don’t blow up and harm ourselves or other people, and we need to learn to take life less seriously. This is why I feel comedy is so important. I’ve never been a big comedy writer, but the concept of joking about life, both the positive and negative, lightens the heavy feeling I have in my heart.

Bringing this back to the concept we were supposed to talk about, that brings me to numerous often-seen character stereotypes seen in fiction. We often see the kind of people who bottle up their emotions until they come out and explode. We see the kind of people who cope with negativity through jokes. We see the kind of people who can’t stop crying about things but are often the first to comfort people who can’t cry. They are stereotypes because we see these patterns quite a bit within human brains, and I feel like the reason the most fascinating stories feature the most diverse cast of characters in terms of mentality is because we see these unlikely groups come together and interact. Especially in the day and age of a pandemic, these stories draw us in, since it gives us a strange sense of completion, since everyone in the group usually represents something different about the human mind.

Well, I’m gonna stop this rant. I’m getting tired and it will likely devolve into nonsense if I keep it up for too long. I hope that perhaps you may take something from reading this. I don’t know all the answers; these are all just my own thoughts, and I want to get into the habit of documenting my philosophy, especially when it comes to writing.

Final Fantasy IX – Not Just a Game, But an Experience (Spoilers)

Final Fantasy IX is a game I’ve had quite a history with. It was the first of the 3D Final Fantasy games I played almost a decade ago, and I’ve always enjoyed its charm. But for some reason, I could never beat it. It was typically external reasons. The first time I tried, my PS1 broke and I could no longer play it. The second time was on someone else’s system, so I didn’t have enough time to get to the end. The list goes on. I’ve had multiple versions of the game over the years, but was never able to beat it for some reason.

Until yesterday, that is.

For the past few months, I’ve been playing the Switch port of the game. It was really quite nice, given the fast forward function makes level grinding significantly faster. There were a few glitches and my game crashed multiple times, but through all the struggles, I finally made it to the end of the game yesterday. I knew how it ended because I used to be obsessed with Final Fantasy stuff online, so I learned much about the plot of games through reading about them, but it was the first time I got to see it firsthand. It’s quite rare for me to beat a game I’ve never beaten before, as it takes me years to get through one, but anyone can tell you that there’s a big difference between just knowing how a game ends and experiencing it for yourself. The feeling of happiness and accomplishment that came from beating this game I’ve been trying to beat for almost 10 years was indescribable.

I think that comes from the fact that you played through the game to thee end yourself. You experienced the same hardships as the characters in the game. You saw their emotions as the story developed, you were there with them the whole time. So to finally see the story come to a close brings a sense of satisfaction and, well, closure. I feel like that’s obvious to most people who play games, but to someone like me who never really gets that chance due to procrastination or what have you, it’s like a new realization. After beating it, even my girlfriend encouraged me to start beating more games I’ve been wanting to beat over the years to get that feeling of accomplishment and closure with all these games I’ve started but never finished. With that, I’m on a bit of a journey, though that’s all beside the point. I want to talk about my experience with Final Fantasy IX.

I’ve seen the beginning of this game so many times that I basically have it memorized. I don’t know if it’s a poor attention span or what, but that’s typically my Achilles’ heel when it comes to video games. I start these games over so much that I get bored and eventually procrastinate, making it to where I just never make progress. (That’s why I haven’t beaten Persona 5 Royal yet.) It’s also well-known that the combat speed in Final Fantasy IX is incredibly slow, especially when compared to the rest of the series. That’s a big part of why it took me so long to finally beat this gmae. However, once I got past that and just dealt with it, I started enjoying the game much more. When you play a Final Fantasy game, you’re usually in it for the story and characters, not the gameplay. (Though I do have a fondness for turn-based RPGs as a whole.) With that in mind, I appreciated the game more. I took more time looking at my surroundings, I read the dialogue with mindfulness, taking it all in, and just enjoying the music as a whole, adn I found it was far more enjoyable than I ever anticipated.

On top of that, reaching the end of the game was quite a trip. All the numerous storylines you’ve seen throughout the game coming together at the end was amazing. The last time I got to Disc Four of the game, I was still 14 years old, so seeing the endgame as an adult was like experiencing it for the first time. I’d heard that the ending feels rushed, and that the final boss doesn’t really make much sense, but when I played it myself, I feel like it worked well. The only part that felt rushed to me was the final dungeon itself, Memoria. It was relatively short, and while you did get some nice drops of lore, it felt rather vague. Perhaps that was intentional, because everything after Memoria no longer felt rushed to me.

I finally got to the two fights preceding the final boss. The first one was a fight I never won as a kid, so when I beat it, I was nervous but excited at the same time. I was ready to take Kuja on. I had a bit of trouble, but I had an incredibly solid team at the same time, so I took him down with relative “ease,” if you can even call it that. When I beat him, I wanted to stop for a moment, but I pressed on, ready to take on the true final boss, which is a character not technically mentioned at all throughout the game, which is why I feel people think it makes no sense. But it made sense to me. To me, the final boss represents death and the fear of death that many of us mortals feel. Beating the boss does not mean putting an end to death, but it’s like a symbolic fight where you cast away your fear of death and choose to live without that fear. That’s how I saw it. You come face-to-face with the fact that you will indeed die someda and when the fear of it comes up, instead of letting it consume your days alive, you fight the fear, telling it that you know it will happen someday, but there’s literally no reason to fear it. Especially when you still have life in you.

Final Fantasy IX, to me, is a game about that existentialism, the knowledge that you will die, but it’s okay. Right here and now, you’re alive. While you have this life, don’t stress out about the inevitable. Instead, just live. Don’t just survive: live. We’re not meant to live in fear, sadness, or anger. We’re not meant to be alone either. Love people. Love yourself especially. You may be your own worst critic, but if you were to ask your friends, if they are good friends who see the real you, they’d probably say you’re pretty damn great and are deserving of life. Like Zidane says to Kuja at the end, no one in the world is useless. So if you feel that way, that would be your emotions lying to you. I could just be getting preachy, but these are my honest feelings after having seen the whole game firsthand. Final Fantasy IX has an amazing message, one I think everyone needs to know.

Ys I & II Chronicles – First Impressions

Feels like it’s been a while since I wrote one of these “reviews.” Probably because it’s been a while since I felt so passionate about the beginning of a game. (Depression’s a jerk, that’s for sure.) However, I just started playing this game last night, and let me tell you: the impression it made on me is so incredible. Last time a game’s intro got to me this much was when I played Persona 3 for the first time.

At first, I wasn’t sure how to feel about it. I’m far more of a turn-based RPG fan. I got this game because it’s made by Nihon Falcom, the creators of one of my favorite RPGs of all time: Trails of Cold Steel. With that, I was expecting it to be a turn-based game, but when I realized it was an action RPG, it slightly turned me away. Only for a little bit, however. I gave it a day’s thought, then booted the game up last night. Let me say I was blown away.

The combat in Ys I is very simplistic. It was designed with accessibility in mind, so basically, all you need is the D-pad or analog stick to fight. You ram into the enemy, and if you hit them from the right angle, you can damage them without taking damage yourself. It’s simple, but when you get into a rhythm of ramming into enemies and grinding, it gets rather fun!

I can’t say much about the plot yet since I’m only two hours into the game and just made it to the first dungeon, but I can say that it’s one of those stories where less is really more. The game focuses a lot more on exploration and combat, but the story is very present. You know the protagonist well (for the most part), you understand the circumstances, and the plot still progresses. A lot of the dialogue mostly comes from talking to NPCs in the various towns, but that’s also where you get more insight on the plot. So in a way, you can sort of choose how much information you as the player take in.

Enough about that. The thing that really stuck out to me was the music. As a fan of the Legend of Heroes series, it’s no secret to me that Falcom games have kickass music, and this game is no exception. You start out in a town, and once you’ve done your exploring and talking to NPCs, the only other step you can think to do is to leave town despite everyone’s warnings saying it’s dangerous out there. However, the moment you step outside, you’re greeted by one of the most kickass overworld themes I think I’ve ever heard.

Let’s hope YouTube doesn’t take this video down.

Once I heard this song and got used to the incredibly addicting combat system, let’s just say I was absolutely hooked. This song, along with the simplistic-yet-amazing combat, makes you feel like a total badass when you’re going around wiping out the monsters threatening the local towns. I spent forever just grinding last night because this music never got old.

I certainly plan on playing the rest of the series after beating this game, that’s for sure. This was way too good of a first impression for me to pass up on the rest of the games.

Making a Game

I’m not what you’d call an expert developer. Hell, I’m hardly a developer as is. I only know basic coding for games, and I generally work with premade engines like RPG Maker and such so I only have to worry about the game itself. Even so, I find that developing a game, especially as a solo developer, has been a whole chore in itself.

For well over a year, I’ve been using RPG Maker MV to create a story-driven fantasy RPG called The Crystal’s Tale. This game is inspired by the plot of the first novel I have ever written and maintains the original concept while taking the many things I’ve learned over the past 17 years as an author into consideration. And in that past year, I have completed the Prologue chapter, and as of this article being written, I am still not done with Chapter One.

It’s not like what I’ve created is short, either. For only being the prologue and first chapter, the game has quite a bit of substance to it, lasting almost four hours long counting the duration of the optional dungeon. (Even then, the optional dungeon takes up about an hour or less depending on when you choose to go in.) But still, for how long I’ve been working on it, you would expect that I would be a little further along in the process. That’s what I assumed, at least. That’s a long time to be working on a game.

But of course, there are more factors in this process than have been accounted for. Life events and changes, work, other creative endeavors (I’m an author first and foremost, so the game comes secondary to my writing work), the list goes on. However, even if you take those out of the way, I still probably wouldn’t have been finished with the first chapter yet. Why is that? Because of the work that goes into making a game by yourself.

When you’re a solo developer, you are the whole dev team. You’re the writer, the programmer, the artist, the music composer, the director, the producer, and so much more, even when using an engine as simple and easy to use as RPG Maker. RPG Maker has some amazing artwork, music, and sound effects built into the engine, which are amazing as placeholders or if you just want to make a game with the default assets. I’m using the art in the engine for now since doing all my art for this game that will potentially last 30-80 hours would take much longer, and I want the base game finished before I do all of that.

However, there is something I am doing that impedes my progress, and that is composing every single track in the game.

I have a background in music. Nothing extensive; I took four months of music theory, eight years of choir, a couple years of musical theatre, and I’ve been experimenting in music composition since I was 14 years old. And as a fan of video game music, developing my own game and putting my own music in it sounds ideal. But with this, the problem lies with the fact that I want the soundtrack to have a unique song for almost every situation. I even want the main battle theme to change every time you start a new chapter. Doing this, though, results in me stopping the progress of my game for weeks, sometimes months, until I get the music I want written. That’s just how my work flow has been, since I’m not always in the mood to work on my music.

With that being said, it will likely take plenty of time for me to get this game finished, especially as a solo developer who is way too determined to make sure the soundtrack is as good as can be. However, I am excited to share it with you guys. I plan on releasing it completely for free to the public once it is finished, and I will provide updates here! If you are familiar with RPG Maker and have any suggestions or tips or anything, feel free to let me know!

Here are some samples of the game’s soundtrack so far!

This is the Overworld theme. At least, the first one.
This is the theme of the first town in the game.
This is the first main battle theme in the game.
And here’s my personal favorite. This track plays during battles in the first optional dungeon.

What Made You Fall in Love With Video Games?

This is a question I am genuinely curious about for pretty much anyone. If you’re passionate about video games, then at some point in time, there was one game that sparked that passion. In the comments, let me know what is that video game that made you fall in love with the whole medium, and what about that game is what made you feel that way?

Nostalgia in Video Games

I’ve been on a Final Fantasy kick the past few days, going back and playing a bunch at once, which is never a good idea, but I like to keep my options open, so I generally play multiple games at a time instead of focusing on one. (Gotta love starting with a run-on sentence.) But after playing them for a while, I got to thinking about my feelings regarding the series. Primarily, the fact that my tastes have changed.

Growing up, Final Fantasy IX was my go-to game, at least until my PS1 broke. Then I just got the port on the PSP and PS3 before it was released on the current gen consoles. There was something I loved about its world, the characters, and the story it had to tell. Back then, I didn’t have as much experience with the series as I do now. I was still new to RPGs in general. But after spending almost 50 hours on the game in my current playthrough, I’ve realized that I don’t quite feel its magic as much as I used to. Granted, that could be because of dealing with adult life in the middle of a pandemic and a screwed up government, so magic is pretty hard to come by these days, but still.

Whether it’s that or the fact that I just burned myself out on the game, I don’t feel it the way I used to. With that, I decided to take a break from Final Fantasy IX and start a new file in Final Fantasy VII instead. (With the help of my girlfriend, because I am indecisive and couldn’t choose between VII and VIII, so she chose for me.) The moment I booted the game up and heard the opening theme, I felt right back at home. Even as I write this post, I’m blaring the Final Fantasy VII soundtrack. I’m already three hours in with Aerith in Wall Market, and still having a blast.

After playing it for just a few minutes, however, I realized something. I even talked to my brother about it to see if he felt the same. I have the Final Fantasy VII Remake, and I have absolutely and thoroughly enjoyed it. However, I seem to enjoy the original game more despite the fact that the remake added so many amazing new parts and fixed many of the narrative issues the original game had. But why is that, when the remake is most definitely an improvement? My brother got back to me and said he felt the same way, and explained it’s because of the nostalgia we have attached to the game.

As kids, even though we never had a copy of the game because it was too expensive online due to scalpers, we were super into Final Fantasy VII‘s lore, the characters, the story, the music, everything. We’d seen Advent Children multiple times, we had a copy of Crisis Core that we played the hell out of, we watched playthroughs, we pretended to be characters from the game when playing outside, and we even attempted to dress as Cloud and Sephiroth one Halloween.

Thinking about it that way, it occurred to me that the nostalgia was a big reason why I had such an attachment to the original game. Playing it brings me back to that point in time when life wasn’t so crazy. But of course, that’s just looking at life through rose-tinted glasses. We often make the past seem much grander than it really was, especially when the present day feels so hopeless. While it’s fine to reminisce on the past, it’s important to avoid over glorifying it, since that makes us resent the present even more. At least, in my experience. The point is that Final Fantasy VII gives me this feeling of being right at home. On top of that, I just enjoy the turn-based combat system more.

While I personally enjoy the original Final Fantasy VII more than the remake, that doesn’t mean I think any less of the remake. Heck, even now, I also feel like playing that. What it means is that this solidifies that our tastes are purely subjective, because we don’t all share the same memories. The collective unconscious might be a thing, but at the end of the day, we’ve all lived our own lives and made our own memories. We each have memories attached to things like video games, music, books, shows, movies, etc. That’s often why we get attached to them. It’s not the only reason we get attached to them, of course. That’s a whole other article in itself right there. But it is a common reason.

While nostalgia does often increase our love for a game, I’ve noticed that a lot of people either use it against others, or get defensive if others don’t like a game they enjoyed, or if someone likes a game they did not enjoy. Looking at it from a psychological point of view, I always saw this as a case of someone making the things they like part of their identity. So when someone dislikes something they like, it’s as though they feel like those people are disliking them, and they take it personally, intentional or not. I say that because that’s how I used to be and still sometimes feel.

When that happens, I reevaluate myself. The world is crazy right now. With social media being a thing, it’s easy for us to lose our sense of self. Perhaps it’s a feeling of inadequacy, helplessness, loneliness, or we’re lacking something important in our lives, like serotonin. Something makes us latch onto the things we enjoy and treat them like they’re an extension of ourselves, and that becomes a very thin shield to protect our rather fragile hearts. There’s nothing wrong with enjoying a game, especially if it brings back wonderful memories. We all need any bit of happiness we can get. It’s equally important to not forget our sense of self.

Persona 3’s Unique Effect

Persona 3 is a game I’ve written about before, but I wanted to go back to it for a little bit to discuss it from a more personal perspective. Over the years, I’ve noticed a particular effect this game has on myself and others alike. That effect has become even more apparent to me now. Part of it is the fact that I keep coming back to it. When I deal with depression, I’m usually not in the mood for any game, nor am I in the mood to write. (Which leads to other complications, but that’s another story.) However, I restarted this game today, and played for almost three hours without even realizing it.

There’s a certain charm to Persona 3, specifically the PS2 versions. Don’t get me wrong; the PSP version is amazing and I absolutely adore the female protagonist. But something about the PS2 version feels different, and keeps me coming back even after I’ve fallen victim to Night Queen for the billionth time. The obvious answer would probably be nostalgia, since FES was the game that started my passion for the Megaten series. However, I feel like that’s just looking at it from the surface. I think there’s more to it.

Persona 3’s themes cover an internal struggle, overcoming grief and depression, and perhaps one of the hardest things we as humans must face: accepting the inevitability of our deaths. The first line in the game is “Time waits for no one. It delivers us all to the same end.” I didn’t realize the significance of that intro until long after I played the game for the first time and started understanding the true meaning behind the game. While it is about death and depression, that’s not all it’s about.

I feel like everyone could come up with their own interpretation for the game’s deeper implications, but here’s what I’ve come up with. It’s less about the sorrowful elements of the themes and more about how accepting the inevitability of death is only half of the equation. Once you’ve accepted that and acknowledged that you have a limited amount of time here, enjoy the time you have. Tell the people closest to you that you love them. We never know what tomorrow may bring, so treasure the time we have today.

So, that’s my not-so-revolutionizing revolution about Persona 3’s themes. What does this have to do about its special effect? It’s the simple fact that even though these themes aren’t super obvious, the game was so well-crafted that it’s hidden everywhere in the subtlest of places. You can feel the passion behind the game, the care that was put into making sure it told the story it was meant to tell and to convey the messages the writers wanted to get across. It may not be my favorite Persona game, but it has changed my life for the better, and I will continue playing it for many years to come.